2020 Chevrolet Trax vs. 2019 Honda HR-V

Detailed Review, Specifications & Comparison

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Safety

To help make backing safer, the Trax (except LS)’s optional cross-path warning system uses wide-angle radar in the rear bumper to alert the driver to vehicles approaching from the side, helping the driver avoid collisions. The HR-V doesn’t offer a cross-path warning system.

The Trax has standard OnStar®, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to get turn-by-turn driving directions, remotely unlock your doors if you lock your keys in, help track down your vehicle if it’s stolen or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The HR-V doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the Trax and the HR-V have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front wheel drive, height adjustable front shoulder belts, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, rearview cameras, available all wheel drive, collision warning systems, lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems and rear parking sensors.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Chevrolet Trax is safer than the Honda HR-V:

Trax

HR-V

OVERALL STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

Driver

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

HIC

122

481

Passenger

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

Chest Compression

.3 inches

.5 inches

Neck Injury Risk

38%

41%

Neck Stress

122 lbs.

218 lbs.

Leg Forces (l/r)

249/289 lbs.

574/500 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH and into a post at 20 MPH, results indicate that the Chevrolet Trax is safer than the Honda HR-V:

Trax

HR-V

Front Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

73

148

Chest Movement

.7 inches

.8 inches

Abdominal Force

120 G’s

158 G’s

Rear Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

100

357

Spine Acceleration

33 G’s

59 G’s

Into Pole

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Spine Acceleration

46 G’s

48 G’s

Hip Force

707 lbs.

799 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

Warranty

The Trax’s corrosion warranty is 1 year longer than the HR-V’s (6 vs. 5 years).

There are almost 3 times as many Chevrolet dealers as there are Honda dealers, which makes it much easier should you ever need service under the Trax’s warranty.

Reliability

The Chevrolet Trax’s engine uses a cast iron block for durability, while the HR-V’s engine uses an aluminum block. Aluminum engine blocks are much more prone to warp and crack at high temperatures than cast iron.

To reliably start during all conditions and help handle large electrical loads, the Trax has a standard 525-amp battery. The HR-V’s 410-amp battery isn’t as powerful.

J.D. Power and Associates’ 2019 Initial Quality Study of new car owners surveyed provide the statistics that show that Chevrolet vehicles are better in initial quality than Honda vehicles. J.D. Power ranks Chevrolet 6th in initial quality, above the industry average. With 13 more problems per 100 vehicles, Honda is ranked 16th, below the industry average.

J.D. Power and Associates’ 2019 survey of the owners of three-year-old vehicles provides the long-term dependability statistics that show that Chevrolet vehicles are more reliable than Honda vehicles. J.D. Power ranks Chevrolet fourth in reliability, above the industry average. With 31 more problems per 100 vehicles, Honda is ranked 16th.

Engine

The Trax’s 1.4 turbo 4 cyl. produces 21 lbs.-ft. more torque (148 vs. 127) than the HR-V’s 1.8 SOHC 4 cyl.

As tested in Motor Trend the Chevrolet Trax is faster than the Honda HR-V:

Trax

HR-V

Zero to 60 MPH

9.3 sec

9.5 sec

Quarter Mile

17.1 sec

17.3 sec

Brakes and Stopping

For better stopping power the Trax’s front brake rotors are larger than those on the HR-V:

Trax

HR-V

Front Rotors

11.8 inches

11.5 inches

The Trax stops much shorter than the HR-V:

Trax

HR-V

70 to 0 MPH

166 feet

183 feet

Car and Driver

60 to 0 MPH

113 feet

127 feet

Motor Trend

Tires and Wheels

For better ride, handling and brake cooling the Trax offers optional 18-inch wheels. The HR-V’s largest wheels are only 17-inches.

Suspension and Handling

The Trax has standard front and rear gas-charged shocks for better control over choppy roads. The HR-V’s suspension doesn’t offer gas-charged shocks.

For better maneuverability, the Trax’s turning circle is .7 feet tighter than the HR-V’s (36.7 feet vs. 37.4 feet).

Passenger Space

The Trax has .1 inches more front headroom, .5 inches more rear headroom and 3.3 inches more rear hip room than the HR-V.

Ergonomics

The Trax LT/Premier has a standard remote vehicle starting system, so the vehicle can be started from inside the driver's house. This allows the driver to comfortably warm up the engine before going out to the vehicle. The HR-V doesn’t offer a remote starting system.

The power windows standard on both the Trax and the HR-V have locks to prevent small children from operating them. When the lock on the Trax is engaged the driver can still operate all of the windows, for instance to close one opened by a child. The HR-V prevents the driver from operating the other windows just as it does the other passengers.

The Trax’s front and rear power windows all lower with one touch of the switches, making it more convenient at drive-up windows and toll booths, or when talking with someone outside of the car. The HR-V’s passenger windows don’t open automatically.

The Trax’s variable intermittent wipers have an adjustable delay to allow the driver to choose a setting that best clears the windshield during light rain or mist. The HR-V LX/Sport’s standard fixed intermittent wipers only have one fixed delay setting, so the driver will have to manually switch them between slow and intermittent.

The Trax has a standard automatic headlight on/off feature. When the ignition is on, the headlights automatically turn on at dusk and off after dawn. When the ignition turns off, the headlights turn off after a delay timed to allow you to securely get to your front door. The HR-V has an automatic headlight on/off feature standard only on the EX/EX-L/Touring.

The Trax has a standard center folding armrest for the rear passengers. A center armrest helps make rear passengers more comfortable. The HR-V doesn’t offer a rear seat center armrest.

The Trax LT/Premier has a 115-volt a/c outlet on the center console, allowing you to recharge a laptop or run small household appliances without special adapters that can break or get misplaced. The HR-V doesn’t offer a house-current electrical outlet.

Economic Advantages

According to The Car Book by Jack Gillis, the Trax is less expensive to operate than the HR-V because typical repairs cost much less on the Trax than the HR-V, including $343 less for a starter and $35 less for fuel injection.

Recommendations

The Chevrolet Trax outsold the Honda HR-V by 5% during 2018.

© 1991-2018 Advanta-STAR Automotive Research. All rights reserved.

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