2019 Volkswagen Arteon vs. 2019 Ford Taurus

Detailed Review, Specifications & Comparison

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Safety

The Arteon has standard Autonomous Emergency Braking, which use forward mounted sensors to warn the driver of a possible collision ahead. If the driver doesn’t react and the system determines a collision is imminent, it automatically applies the brakes at full-force in order to reduce the force of the crash or avoid it altogether. The Taurus offers an available collision warning system without the automated brake feature that would prevent or reduce the collision if the driver fails to react.

The Arteon has a standard Automatic Post-Collision Braking System, which automatically applies the brakes in the event of a crash to help prevent secondary collisions and prevent further injuries. The Taurus doesn’t offer a post collision braking system: in the event of a collision that triggers the airbags, more collisions are possible without the protection of airbags that may have already deployed.

Over 200 people are killed each year when backed over by motor vehicles. The Arteon offers optional Maneuver Braking that uses rear sensors to monitor and automatically apply the brakes to prevent a rear collision. The Taurus doesn’t offer backup collision prevention brakes.

The Volkswagen Arteon has Daytime Running Lights to help keep it more visible under all conditions. Canadian government studies show that driving with lights during the day reduces accidents by 11% by making vehicles more conspicuous. The Taurus doesn’t offer Daytime Running Lights.

The Arteon offers an optional Overhead View Camera to allow the driver to see objects all around the vehicle on a screen. The Taurus only offers a rear monitor and front and rear parking sensors that beep. That doesn’t help with obstacles to the sides.

Both the Arteon and the Taurus have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front wheel drive, height adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, rearview cameras, available all wheel drive and lane departure warning systems.

Warranty

The Arteon comes with a full 6-year/72000-mile basic warranty, which covers the entire car. The Taurus’ 3-year/36,000-mile basic warranty expires 3 years and 36,000 miles sooner.

The Arteon’s corrosion warranty is 5 years longer than the Taurus’ (10 vs. 5 years).

Reliability

The Volkswagen Arteon’s engine uses a cast iron block for durability, while the Taurus’ engines use an aluminum block. Aluminum engine blocks are much more prone to warp and crack at high temperatures than cast iron.

From surveys of all its subscribers, Consumer Reports’ December 2018 Auto Issue reports that Volkswagen vehicles are more reliable than Ford vehicles. Consumer Reports ranks Volkswagen 2 places higher in reliability than Ford.

Fuel Economy and Range

On the EPA test cycle the Arteon gets better fuel mileage than the Taurus:

 

 

 

MPG

Arteon

 

FWD

2.0 turbo 4 cyl.

22 city/31 hwy

 

AWD

2.0 turbo 4 cyl.

20 city/27 hwy

Taurus

 

FWD

3.5 DOHC V6

18 city/26 hwy

 

AWD

3.5 DOHC V6

17 city/24 hwy

 

 

SHO 3.5 turbo V6

16 city/24 hwy

In heavy traffic or at stoplights the Arteon’s engine automatically turns off when the vehicle is stopped, saving fuel and reducing pollution. The engine is automatically restarted when the driver gets ready to move again. (Start/Stop isn’t accounted in present EPA fuel mileage tests.) The Taurus doesn’t offer an automatic engine start/stop system.

Transmission

An eight-speed automatic is standard on the Volkswagen Arteon, for better acceleration and lower engine speed on the highway. Only a six-speed automatic is available for the Taurus.

Tires and Wheels

For better traction, the Arteon has larger tires than the Taurus (245/45R18 vs. 235/60R17).

The Arteon’s standard tires provide better handling because they have a lower 45 series profile (height to width ratio) that provides a stiffer sidewall than the Taurus SE’s standard 60 series tires. The Arteon’s optional tires have a lower 40 series profile than the Taurus Limited’s 45 series tires.

For better ride, handling and brake cooling the Arteon has standard 18-inch wheels. Smaller 17-inch wheels are standard on the Taurus SE.

Suspension and Handling

The Arteon has a standard driver-adjustable suspension system. It allows the driver to choose between an extra-supple ride, reducing fatigue on long trips, or a sport setting, which allows maximum control for tricky roads. The Taurus’ suspension doesn’t offer adjustable shock absorbers.

For better maneuverability, the Arteon’s turning circle is .4 feet tighter than the Taurus SHO’s (39 feet vs. 39.4 feet). The Arteon’s turning circle is .5 feet tighter than the Taurus’ (39 feet vs. 39.5 feet).

Chassis

The Volkswagen Arteon may be more efficient, handle and accelerate better because it weighs about 250 to 450 pounds less than the Ford Taurus.

The Arteon is 11.5 inches shorter than the Taurus, making the Arteon easier to handle, maneuver and park in tight spaces.

Cargo Capacity

The Arteon has a much larger trunk than the Taurus (27.2 vs. 20.1 cubic feet).

To make loading and unloading groceries and cargo easier when your hands are full, the Arteon SEL Premium’s power liftgate can be opened or closed just by kicking your foot under the back bumper, leaving your hands completely free. The Taurus doesn’t offer a power or hands-free opening trunk.

Ergonomics

The Arteon’s front and rear power windows all open or close fully with one touch of the switches, making it more convenient at drive-up windows and toll booths, or when talking with someone outside the car. The Taurus’ passenger windows don’t open or close automatically.

The Arteon’s rain-sensitive wipers adjust their speed and turn on and off automatically based on the amount of rainfall on the windshield. This allows the driver to concentrate on driving without constantly adjusting the wipers. The Taurus’ standard manually variable intermittent wipers have to be constantly adjusted.

To help drivers see further while navigating curves, the Arteon R-Line/SEL/SEL Premium has standard adaptive headlights to illuminate around corners automatically by reading vehicle speed and steering wheel angle. The Taurus doesn’t offer cornering lights.

The Arteon’s standard outside mirrors include heating elements to clear off the mirrors for better visibility. Ford only offers heated mirrors on the Taurus SEL/Limited/SHO.

The Arteon has a standard dual zone air conditioning allows the driver and front passenger to choose two completely different temperatures so people with different temperature preferences won’t have to compromise. This makes both the driver and front passenger as comfortable as possible. Dual zone air conditioning is only available on the Taurus SEL/Limited/SHO.

© 1991-2018 Advanta-STAR Automotive Research. All rights reserved.

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