2019 Honda Passport vs. 2019 Volkswagen Tiguan

Detailed Review, Specifications & Comparison

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Safety

Using vehicle speed sensors and seat sensors, smart airbags in the Passport deploy with different levels of force or don’t deploy at all to help better protect passengers of all sizes in different collisions. The Passport’s side airbags will shut off if a child is leaning against the door. The Tiguan’s airbags don’t have smart features and will always deploy full force.

To prevent power induced skids and loss of control on slick surfaces, the Honda Passport has standard full range traction control. The Tiguan’s traction control is for low speeds only. Low traction conditions at higher speeds are more dangerous, making the need for full range traction control important.

Both the Passport and the Tiguan have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, side-impact head airbags, front wheel drive, height adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, rearview cameras, available all wheel drive, blind spot warning systems, rear parking sensors and rear cross-path warning.

Warranty

The Passport comes with free roadside assistance for 3 years 36,000 miles. Honda will send help if you run out of gas, need a jump-start, lock your keys in or need any assistance on the road. Volkswagen doesn’t give free roadside assistance for the Tiguan.

There are over 60 percent more Honda dealers than there are Volkswagen dealers, which makes it much easier should you ever need service under the Passport’s warranty.

Reliability

The engine in the Passport has a single overhead cam for simplicity. The engine in the Tiguan has dual overhead cams, which add to the number of moving parts and the complexity of the cylinder heads.

J.D. Power and Associates’ 2018 Initial Quality Study of new car owners surveyed provide the statistics that show that Honda vehicles are better in initial quality than Volkswagen vehicles. J.D. Power ranks Honda 23rd in initial quality. With 1 more problems per 100 vehicles, Volkswagen is ranked 24th.

J.D. Power and Associates’ 2018 survey of the owners of three-year-old vehicles provides the long-term dependability statistics that show that Honda vehicles are more reliable than Volkswagen vehicles. J.D. Power ranks Honda 12th in reliability, above the industry average. With 17 more problems per 100 vehicles, Volkswagen is ranked 19th.

From surveys of all its subscribers, Consumer Reports’ December 2018 Auto Issue reports that Honda vehicles are more reliable than Volkswagen vehicles. Consumer Reports ranks Honda 1 place higher in reliability than Volkswagen.

Engine

The Passport’s 3.5 SOHC V6 produces 96 more horsepower (280 vs. 184) and 41 lbs.-ft. more torque (262 vs. 221) than the Tiguan’s 2.0 turbo 4 cyl.

Fuel Economy and Range

An engine control system that can shut down half of the engine’s cylinders helps improve the Passport’s fuel efficiency. The Tiguan doesn’t offer a system that can shut down part of the engine.

To lower fuel costs and make buying fuel easier, the Honda Passport uses regular unleaded gasoline. The Tiguan requires premium, which can cost 20 to 55 cents more per gallon.

The Passport has 4.2 gallons more fuel capacity than the Tiguan FWD’s standard fuel tank (19.5 vs. 15.3 gallons), for longer range between fill-ups. The Passport has 3.6 gallons more fuel capacity than the Tiguan AWD’s standard fuel tank (19.5 vs. 15.9 gallons).

The Passport has a standard cap-less fueling system. The fuel filler is automatically opened when the fuel nozzle is inserted and automatically closed when it’s removed. This eliminates the need to unscrew and replace the cap and it reduces fuel evaporation, which causes pollution. The Tiguan doesn’t offer a cap-less fueling system.

Transmission

A nine-speed automatic is standard on the Honda Passport, for better acceleration and lower engine speed on the highway. Only an eight-speed automatic is available for the Tiguan.

Tires and Wheels

For better traction, the Passport has larger standard tires than the Tiguan (245/50R20 vs. 215/65R17). The Passport Touring/Elite’s tires are larger than the largest tires available on the Tiguan (265/45R20 vs. 255/45R19).

The Passport Sport/EX-L’s standard tires provide better handling because they have a lower 50 series profile (height to width ratio) that provides a stiffer sidewall than the Tiguan S/SE’s standard 65 series tires.

For better ride, handling and brake cooling the Passport has standard 20-inch wheels. Smaller 17-inch wheels are standard on the Tiguan S/SE.

The Passport has a standard easy tire fill system. When inflating the tires, the vehicle’s integrated tire pressure sensors keep track of the pressure as the tires fill and tell the driver when the tires are inflated to the proper pressure. The Tiguan doesn’t offer vehicle monitored tire inflation.

Suspension and Handling

For a smoother ride and more stable handling, the Passport’s wheelbase is 1.1 inches longer than on the Tiguan (110.9 inches vs. 109.8 inches).

For better handling and stability, the average track (width between the wheels) on the Passport is 4.6 inches wider in the front and 5 inches wider in the rear than the track on the Tiguan.

For greater off-road capability the Passport has a greater minimum ground clearance than the Tiguan (8.1 vs. 7.9 inches), allowing the Passport to travel over rougher terrain without being stopped or damaged.

Chassis

The Passport uses computer-generated active noise cancellation to help remove annoying noise and vibration from the passenger compartment, especially at low frequencies. The Tiguan doesn’t offer active noise cancellation.

Passenger Space

The Passport has .5 inches more front headroom, .7 inches more front legroom, 5 inches more front shoulder room, 1 inch more rear headroom, 3.1 inches more rear legroom and 6 inches more rear shoulder room than the Tiguan.

Cargo Capacity

The Passport has a much larger cargo volume with its rear seat up than the Tiguan 5-Passenger with its rear seat up (41.2 vs. 37.6 cubic feet). The Passport has a much larger cargo volume with its rear seat folded than the Tiguan with all its rear seats folded (77.9 vs. 73.5 cubic feet).

A standard locking glovebox keeps your small valuables safer in the Passport. The Tiguan doesn’t offer locking storage for small valuables.

Towing

The Passport’s standard towing capacity is much higher than the Tiguan’s (3500 vs. 1500 pounds). Maximum trailer towing in the Volkswagen Tiguan is only 1500 pounds. The Passport offers up to a 5000 lbs. towing capacity.

Ergonomics

The Passport Touring/Elite’s standard easy entry system glides the driver’s seat back when the door is unlocked or the ignition is switched off, making it easier for the driver to get in and out. The Tiguan doesn’t offer an easy entry system.

If the windows are left open on the Passport the driver can close them all at the outside door handle. On a hot day the driver can lower the windows at the outside door handle or from a distance using the keyless remote. The driver of the Tiguan can’t use the remote to operate the windows.

To improve rear visibility by keeping the rear window clear, the Passport has a standard rear fixed intermittent wiper with a full on position. The rear wiper standard on the Tiguan only has an intermittent setting, so in a hard rain visibility isn’t as good.

The Passport Elite has standard automatic dimming rear and side view mirrors which automatically darken quickly when headlights shine on them, keeping following vehicles from blinding or distracting the driver. The Tiguan offers an automatic rear view mirror, but its side mirrors don’t dim.

Both the Passport and the Tiguan offer available heated front seats. The Passport Touring/Elite also has standard heated rear seats to keep those passengers extremely comfortable in the winter. Heated second row seats aren’t available in the Tiguan.

Standard air-conditioned seats in the Passport Elite keep the driver and front passenger comfortable and take the sting out of hot seats in summer. The Tiguan doesn’t offer air-conditioned seats.

The Passport has a standard dual zone air conditioning allows the driver and front passenger to choose two completely different temperatures so people with different temperature preferences won’t have to compromise. This makes both the driver and front passenger as comfortable as possible. Dual zone air conditioning is only available on the Tiguan SE/SEL/SEL Premium.

The Passport Touring/Elite has a 115-volt a/c outlet, allowing you to recharge a laptop or run small household appliances without special adapters that can break or get misplaced. The Tiguan doesn’t offer a house-current electrical outlet.

© 1991-2018 Advanta-STAR Automotive Research. All rights reserved.

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