2019 Honda Passport vs. 2019 Dodge Journey

Detailed Review, Specifications & Comparison

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Safety

Using vehicle speed sensors and seat sensors, smart airbags in the Passport deploy with different levels of force or don’t deploy at all to help better protect passengers of all sizes in different collisions. The Passport’s side airbags will shut off if a child is leaning against the door. The Journey’s airbags don’t have smart features and will always deploy full force.

The Passport has a standard Collision Mitigation Braking System, which uses forward mounted sensors to warn the driver of a possible collision ahead. If the driver doesn’t react and the system determines a collision is imminent, it automatically applies the brakes at full-force in order to reduce the force of the crash or avoid it altogether. The Journey doesn't offer collision warning or crash mitigation brakes.

The Passport’s lane departure warning system alerts a temporarily inattentive driver when the vehicle begins to leave its lane and gently nudges the vehicle back towards its lane. The Journey doesn’t offer a lane departure warning system.

The Passport Touring/Elite has standard Parking Sensors to help warn the driver about vehicles, pedestrians or other obstacles behind or in front of their vehicle. The Journey doesn’t offer a front parking aid.

The Passport EX-L/Touring/Elite’s blind spot warning system uses digital cameras monitored by computer to alert the driver to moving objects in the vehicle’s blind spots where the side view mirrors don’t reveal them. The Journey doesn’t offer a system to reveal objects in the driver’s blind spots.

To help make backing safer, the Passport EX-L/Touring/Elite’s cross-path warning system uses wide-angle radar in the rear bumper to alert the driver to vehicles approaching from the side, helping the driver avoid collisions. The Journey doesn’t offer a cross-path warning system.

The Passport Touring/Elite has standard HondaLink Assist, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Journey doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the Passport and the Journey have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, side-impact head airbags, front wheel drive, height adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, rearview cameras and available all wheel drive.

Warranty

The Passport’s 5 year corrosion warranty has no mileage limitations, but the corrosion warranty on the Journey runs out after 60,000 miles.

Reliability

The engine in the Passport has a single overhead cam for simplicity. The engines in the Journey have dual overhead cams, which add to the number of moving parts and the complexity of the cylinder heads.

J.D. Power and Associates’ 2018 survey of the owners of three-year-old vehicles provides the long-term dependability statistics that show that Honda vehicles are more reliable than Dodge vehicles. J.D. Power ranks Honda 12th in reliability, above the industry average. With 26 more problems per 100 vehicles, Dodge is ranked 23rd.

From surveys of all its subscribers, Consumer Reports’ December 2018 Auto Issue reports that Honda vehicles are more reliable than Dodge vehicles. Consumer Reports ranks Honda 6 places higher in reliability than Dodge.

Engine

The Passport’s 3.5 SOHC V6 produces 107 more horsepower (280 vs. 173) and 96 lbs.-ft. more torque (262 vs. 166) than the Journey’s standard 2.4 DOHC 4 cyl. The Passport’s 3.5 SOHC V6 produces 2 lbs.-ft. more torque (262 vs. 260) than the Journey’s optional 3.6 DOHC V6.

Fuel Economy and Range

On the EPA test cycle the Passport gets better fuel mileage than the Journey:

 

 

 

MPG

Passport

 

FWD

3.5 SOHC V6

20 city/25 hwy

 

AWD

3.5 SOHC V6

19 city/24 hwy

Journey

 

FWD

2.4 DOHC 4 cyl.

19 city/25 hwy

 

 

3.6 DOHC V6

17 city/25 hwy

 

AWD

3.6 DOHC V6

16 city/24 hwy

An engine control system that can shut down half of the engine’s cylinders helps improve the Passport’s fuel efficiency. The Journey doesn’t offer a system that can shut down part of the engine.

In heavy traffic or at stoplights the Passport’s engine automatically turns off when the vehicle is stopped, saving fuel and reducing pollution. The engine is automatically restarted when the driver gets ready to move again. (Start/Stop isn’t accounted in present EPA fuel mileage tests.) The Journey doesn’t offer an automatic engine start/stop system.

The Passport has a standard cap-less fueling system. The fuel filler is automatically opened when the fuel nozzle is inserted and automatically closed when it’s removed. This eliminates the need to unscrew and replace the cap and it reduces fuel evaporation, which causes pollution. The Journey doesn’t offer a cap-less fueling system.

Transmission and Drivetrain

A nine-speed automatic is standard on the Honda Passport, for better acceleration and lower engine speed on the highway. Only a six-speed automatic is available for the Journey.

The Passport has Intelligent Variable Torque Management, a true all-wheel-drive system, which has torque-vectoring differentials that lock up when they detect wheel-spin so they keep the Passport moving if even only one wheel still has traction. The Journey doesn’t offer a true all-wheel drive system; it could get stuck while one or more wheels still have traction.

Tires and Wheels

For better traction, the Passport has larger standard tires than the Journey (245/50R20 vs. 225/65R17). The Passport Touring/Elite’s tires are larger than the largest tires available on the Journey (265/45R20 vs. 225/65R17).

The Passport Sport/EX-L’s standard tires provide better handling because they have a lower 50 series profile (height to width ratio) that provides a stiffer sidewall than the Journey SE’s standard 65 series tires. The Passport Touring/Elite’s tires have a lower 45 series profile than the Journey Crossroad/GT’s 55 series tires.

For better ride, handling and brake cooling the Passport has standard 20-inch wheels. Smaller 17-inch wheels are standard on the Journey SE. The Journey’s largest wheels are only 19-inches.

The Passport has a standard easy tire fill system. When inflating the tires, the vehicle’s integrated tire pressure sensors keep track of the pressure as the tires fill and tell the driver when the tires are inflated to the proper pressure. The Journey doesn’t offer vehicle monitored tire inflation.

Suspension and Handling

The Passport has vehicle speed sensitive variable-assist power steering, for low-effort parking, better control at highway speeds and during hard cornering, and a better feel of the road. The Journey doesn’t offer variable-assist power steering.

For better handling and stability, the average track (width between the wheels) on the Passport is 5 inches wider in the front and 4.5 inches wider in the rear than the track on the Journey.

Chassis

To almost totally eliminate engine vibration in the passenger area, the Passport has an electronically controlled liquid-filled main engine mount. A computer-controlled electric current in the liquid changes its viscosity, allowing the mount to dampen the engine completely at all RPMs. The Journey uses conventional solid rubber engine mounts.

The Passport uses computer-generated active noise cancellation to help remove annoying noise and vibration from the passenger compartment, especially at low frequencies. The Journey doesn’t offer active noise cancellation.

Passenger Space

The Passport has .1 inches more front legroom, 5.3 inches more front hip room, 4.5 inches more front shoulder room, .2 inches more rear headroom, 3.5 inches more rear legroom, 2.9 inches more rear hip room and 5 inches more rear shoulder room than the Journey.

Cargo Capacity

The Passport has a much larger cargo volume with its rear seat up than the Journey 5-Passenger with its rear seat up (41.2 vs. 39.6 cubic feet). The Passport has a much larger cargo volume with its rear seat folded than the Journey with all its rear seats folded (77.9 vs. 67.6 cubic feet).

Pressing a switch automatically lowers the Passport’s rear seats, to make changing between passengers and cargo easier. The Journey doesn’t offer automatic folding seats.

To make loading and unloading groceries and cargo easier, especially for short adults, the Passport EX-L/Touring/Elite has a standard power liftgate, which opens and closes automatically by pressing a button, or on the Passport Touring/Elite, by just kicking your foot under the back bumper, completely leaving your hands free. The Journey doesn’t offer a power liftgate.

Towing

The Passport’s standard towing capacity is much higher than the Journey’s (3500 vs. 1000 pounds). Maximum trailer towing in the Dodge Journey is only 2500 pounds. The Passport offers up to a 5000 lbs. towing capacity.

Ergonomics

When two different drivers share the Passport EX-L/Touring/Elite, the memory system makes it convenient for both. Each setting activates different, customized memories for the driver’s seat position, outside mirror angle and climate settings. The Journey doesn’t offer a memory system.

The Passport Touring/Elite’s standard easy entry system glides the driver’s seat back when the door is unlocked or the ignition is switched off, making it easier for the driver to get in and out. The Journey doesn’t offer an easy entry system.

The Passport’s front power windows open or close fully with one touch of the switches, making it more convenient at drive-up windows and toll booths, or when talking with someone outside the car. The Journey’s standard power window switches have to be held the entire time to close them fully. Only its driver’s window opens automatically. The Journey GT’s rear windows don’t close automatically.

The Passport Elite’s standard wipers adjust their speed and turn on and off automatically according to the amount of rainfall on the windshield. The Journey’s manually variable intermittent wipers have to be constantly adjusted.

To improve rear visibility by keeping the rear window clear, the Passport has a standard rear fixed intermittent wiper with a full on position. The rear wiper standard on the Journey only has an intermittent setting, so in a hard rain visibility isn’t as good.

While driving with high beams on, sensitive light sensors standard on the Passport detect other vehicles which could be blinded and automatically switch to low beams. The Journey doesn’t offer automatic dimming high beams.

When the Passport EX-L/Touring/Elite is put in reverse, both rearview mirrors tilt from their original position. This gives the driver a better view of the curb during parallel parking maneuvers. Shifting out of reverse puts the mirrors into their original positions. The Journey’s mirrors don’t automatically adjust for backing.

The Passport Elite has standard automatic dimming rear and side view mirrors which automatically darken quickly when headlights shine on them, keeping following vehicles from blinding or distracting the driver. The Journey has an automatic rear view mirror, but its side mirrors don’t dim.

Both the Passport and the Journey offer available heated front seats. The Passport Touring/Elite also has standard heated rear seats to keep those passengers extremely comfortable in the winter. Heated second row seats aren’t available in the Journey.

Standard air-conditioned seats in the Passport Elite keep the driver and front passenger comfortable and take the sting out of hot seats in summer. The Journey doesn’t offer air-conditioned seats.

To keep a safe, consistent following distance, the Passport has a standard Adaptive Cruise Control, which alters the speed of the vehicle without driver intervention. This allows the driver to use cruise control more safely without constantly having to disengage it when approaching slower traffic. The Journey doesn’t offer an adaptive cruise control.

© 1991-2018 Advanta-STAR Automotive Research. All rights reserved.

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