2019 Honda CR-V vs. 2019 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport

Detailed Review, Specifications & Comparison

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Safety

The CR-V EX/EX-L/Touring’s driver alert monitor detects an inattentive driver then sounds a warning and suggests a break. According to the NHTSA, drivers who fall asleep cause about 100,000 crashes and 1500 deaths a year. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer a driver alert monitor.

The CR-V EX/EX-L/Touring has standard HondaLink Assist, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the CR-V and the Outlander Sport have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front wheel drive, height adjustable front shoulder belts, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, rearview cameras, available all wheel drive, crash mitigating brakes, lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems and rear cross-path warning.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Honda CR-V is safer than the Mitsubishi Outlander Sport:

 

CR-V

Outlander Sport

OVERALL STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

 

Driver

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

Neck Injury Risk

23%

29%

Neck Stress

194 lbs.

412 lbs.

Neck Compression

66 lbs.

90 lbs.

Leg Forces (l/r)

58/91 lbs.

334/511 lbs.

 

Passenger

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

Chest Compression

.6 inches

.6 inches

Neck Injury Risk

29%

43%

Neck Stress

124 lbs.

221 lbs.

Leg Forces (l/r)

183/200 lbs.

394/494 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

A significantly tougher test than their original offset frontal crash test, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety does 40 MPH small overlap frontal offset crash tests. In this test, where only 25% of the total width of the vehicle is struck, results indicate that the Honda CR-V is safer than the Outlander Sport:

 

CR-V

Outlander Sport

Overall Evaluation

GOOD

ACCEPTABLE

Restraints

GOOD

ACCEPTABLE

Head Neck Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Peak Head Forces

0 G’s

0 G’s

Steering Column Movement Rearward

1 cm

1 cm

Chest Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Max Chest Compression

23 cm

28 cm

Hip & Thigh Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Femur Force R/L

.3/0 kN

3.43/.93 kN

Hip & Thigh Injury Risk R/L

0%/0%

1%/0%

Lower Leg Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH and into a post at 20 MPH, results indicate that the Honda CR-V is safer than the Mitsubishi Outlander Sport:

 

CR-V

Outlander Sport

 

Front Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

137

163

Abdominal Force

130 G’s

163 G’s

Hip Force

354 lbs.

518 lbs.

 

Rear Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

125

349

Hip Force

609 lbs.

794 lbs.

 

Into Pole

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Max Damage Depth

13 inches

17 inches

Hip Force

743 lbs.

807 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

For its top level performance in all IIHS frontal, side, rear impact and roof-crush tests, with its optional front crash prevention system, and its available headlight’s “Acceptable” rating, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety grants the CR-V the rating of “Top Pick” for 2018, a rating granted to only 85 vehicles tested by the IIHS. The Outlander Sport was not even a standard “Top Pick” for 2018.

Warranty

The CR-V’s corrosion warranty is unlimited miles longer than the Outlander Sport’s (unlimited vs. 100,000 miles).

There are almost 3 times as many Honda dealers as there are Mitsubishi dealers, which makes it much easier should you ever need service under the CR-V’s warranty.

Reliability

J.D. Power and Associates’ 2018 Initial Quality Study of new car owners surveyed provide the statistics that show that Honda vehicles are better in initial quality than Mitsubishi vehicles. J.D. Power ranks Honda 23rd in initial quality. With 9 more problems per 100 vehicles, Mitsubishi is ranked 26th.

J.D. Power and Associates’ 2018 survey of the owners of three-year-old vehicles provides the long-term dependability statistics that show that Honda vehicles are more reliable than Mitsubishi vehicles. J.D. Power ranks Honda 12th in reliability, above the industry average. With 33 more problems per 100 vehicles, Mitsubishi is ranked 26th.

Engine

The CR-V LX’s standard 2.4 DOHC 4 cyl. produces 36 more horsepower (184 vs. 148) and 35 lbs.-ft. more torque (180 vs. 145) than the Outlander Sport ES/SE’s standard 2.0 DOHC 4 cyl. The CR-V LX’s 2.4 DOHC 4 cyl. produces 16 more horsepower (184 vs. 168) and 13 lbs.-ft. more torque (180 vs. 167) than the Outlander Sport GT’s standard 2.4 DOHC 4 cyl. The CR-V EX/EX-L/Touring’s standard 1.5 turbo 4 cyl. produces 22 more horsepower (190 vs. 168) and 12 lbs.-ft. more torque (179 vs. 167) than the Outlander Sport GT’s standard 2.4 DOHC 4 cyl.

As tested in Motor Trend the CR-V LX is faster than the Outlander Sport 2.0 4 cyl. (automatics tested):

 

CR-V

Outlander Sport

Zero to 60 MPH

7.7 sec

10.1 sec

Quarter Mile

16 sec

17.7 sec

Speed in 1/4 Mile

88.4 MPH

78.4 MPH

Fuel Economy and Range

On the EPA test cycle the CR-V gets better fuel mileage than the Outlander Sport:

 

 

 

MPG

CR-V

FWD

Auto

2.4 DOHC 4 cyl.

26 city/32 hwy

 

 

1.5 turbo 4 cyl.

28 city/34 hwy

AWD

Auto

2.4 DOHC 4 cyl.

25 city/31 hwy

 

 

1.5 turbo 4 cyl.

27 city/33 hwy

Outlander Sport

FWD

Manual

2.0 DOHC 4 cyl.

23 city/29 hwy

 

Auto

2.0 DOHC 4 cyl.

24 city/30 hwy

 

 

GT 2.4 DOHC 4 cyl.

23 city/29 hwy

AWD

Auto

2.0 DOHC 4 cyl.

23 city/29 hwy

 

 

2.4 DOHC 4 cyl.

23 city/28 hwy

The CR-V has a standard cap-less fueling system. The fuel filler is automatically opened when the fuel nozzle is inserted and automatically closed when it’s removed. This eliminates the need to unscrew and replace the cap and it reduces fuel evaporation, which causes pollution. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer a cap-less fueling system.

Transmission

The Honda CR-V comes standard with an automatic transmission, for driver comfort, especially in the city. Automatic costs extra on the Outlander Sport.

Brakes and Stopping

The CR-V stops much shorter than the Outlander Sport:

 

CR-V

Outlander Sport

 

70 to 0 MPH

166 feet

184 feet

Car and Driver

60 to 0 MPH

115 feet

125 feet

Motor Trend

Tires and Wheels

For better traction, the CR-V has larger tires than the Outlander Sport (235/65R17 vs. 225/55R18).

Suspension and Handling

For better handling and stability, the average track (width between the wheels) on the CR-V is 2.4 inches wider in the front and 3 inches wider in the rear than the track on the Outlander Sport.

The CR-V Touring AWD handles at .82 G’s, while the Outlander Sport SE 4WD pulls only .80 G’s of cornering force in a Car and Driver skidpad test.

The CR-V LX executes Motor Trend’s “Figure Eight” maneuver 1.3 seconds quicker than the Outlander Sport SE 4WD (27.7 seconds @ .62 average G’s vs. 29 seconds @ .55 average G’s).

Chassis

The front grille of the CR-V uses electronically controlled shutters to close off airflow and reduce drag when less engine cooling is needed. This helps improve highway fuel economy. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer active grille shutters.

The CR-V uses computer-generated active noise cancellation to help remove annoying noise and vibration from the passenger compartment, especially at low frequencies. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer active noise cancellation.

Passenger Space

The CR-V has 8.4 cubic feet more passenger volume than the Outlander Sport (105.9 vs. 97.5).

The CR-V has .7 inches more front headroom, 3 inches more front hip room, 1.7 inches more front shoulder room, 1.3 inches more rear headroom, 4.1 inches more rear legroom and .1 inches more rear shoulder room than the Outlander Sport.

For enhanced passenger comfort on long trips the CR-V’s rear seats recline. The Outlander Sport’s rear seats don’t recline.

Cargo Capacity

The CR-V has a much larger cargo volume with its rear seat up than the Outlander Sport with its rear seat up (39.2 vs. 21.7 cubic feet). The CR-V has a much larger cargo volume with its rear seat folded than the Outlander Sport with its rear seat folded (75.8 vs. 49.5 cubic feet).

Pressing a switch automatically lowers the CR-V’s rear seats, to make changing between passengers and cargo easier. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer automatic folding seats.

A standard locking glovebox (which can’t be accessed with the valet key) keeps your small valuables safer in the CR-V. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer locking storage for small valuables.

To make loading and unloading groceries and cargo easier, especially for short adults, the CR-V EX-L/Touring has a standard power liftgate, which opens and closes automatically by pressing a button, or on the CR-V Touring, by just kicking your foot under the back bumper, completely leaving your hands free. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer a power liftgate.

Towing

The CR-V has a 1500 lbs. towing capacity. The Outlander Sport has no towing capacity.

Ergonomics

When two different drivers share the CR-V EX-L/Touring, the memory seats make it convenient for both. Each setting activates different, customized memories for the driver’s seat position. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer memory seats.

The CR-V EX-L/Touring’s standard easy entry system glides the driver’s seat back when the door is unlocked or the ignition is switched off, making it easier for the driver to get in and out. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer an easy entry system.

The CR-V EX/EX-L/Touring’s front power windows open fully with one touch of the switches, and the driver’s window also automatically closes, making it more convenient at drive-up windows and toll booths, or when talking with someone outside the car. The Outlander Sport’s passenger windows don’t open or close automatically.

If the windows are left open on the CR-V the driver can close them all at the outside door handle. On a hot day the driver can lower the windows at the outside door handle or from a distance using the keyless remote. The driver of the Outlander Sport can only operate the windows from inside the vehicle, with the ignition on.

The Outlander Sport’s standard power locks don’t automatically lock the doors. The CR-V’s standard doors lock when a certain speed is reached. This is an important feature for occupant safety. Locked doors are proven to open less often in collisions, and they are also effective in preventing crime at traffic lights. (The power lock’s automatic feature may have to be activated by your dealer.)

To improve rear visibility by keeping the rear window clear, the CR-V has a standard rear fixed intermittent wiper with a full on position. The rear wiper standard on the Outlander Sport only has an intermittent setting, so in a hard rain visibility isn’t as good.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) conducts detailed tests on headlights for their range both straight ahead and in curves and to be certain they don’t exceed acceptable amounts of glare to oncoming drivers. The CR-V’s available headlights were rated “Acceptable” by the IIHS, while the Outlander Sport’s headlights are rated “Poor.”

To shield the driver and front passenger’s vision over a larger portion of the windshield and side windows, the CR-V has standard extendable sun visors. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer extendable visors.

The CR-V EX/EX-L/Touring’s standard dual zone air conditioning allows the driver and front passenger to choose two completely different temperatures so people with different temperature preferences won’t have to compromise. This makes both the driver and front passenger as comfortable as possible. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer dual zone air conditioning.

Both the CR-V and the Outlander Sport offer rear vents. For greater rear passenger comfort, the CR-V has standard rear air conditioning vents to keep rear occupants cool in summer or warm in winter. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer rear air conditioning vents, only heat vents.

To keep a safe, consistent following distance, the CR-V EX/EX-L/Touring has a standard Adaptive Cruise Control, which alters the speed of the vehicle without driver intervention. This allows the driver to use cruise control more safely without constantly having to disengage it when approaching slower traffic. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer an adaptive cruise control.

Economic Advantages

Insurance will cost less for the CR-V owner. The Complete Car Cost Guide estimates that insurance for the CR-V will cost $360 to $2080 less than the Outlander Sport over a five-year period.

The CR-V will cost the buyer less in the long run because of its superior resale value. The IntelliChoice estimates that the CR-V will retain 48.39% to 49.83% of its original price after five years, while the Outlander Sport only retains 42.4% to 43.19%.

According to The Car Book by Jack Gillis, the CR-V is less expensive to operate than the Outlander Sport because it costs $288 less to do the manufacturer’s suggested maintenance for 50,000 miles. Typical repairs cost much less on the CR-V than the Outlander Sport, including $266 less for a water pump, $52 less for a muffler, $23 less for front brake pads, $6 less for fuel injection, $198 less for a fuel pump, $40 less for front struts, $103 less for a timing belt/chain and $396 less for a power steering pump.

Recommendations

The Honda CR-V has won recognition from these important consumer publications:

 

CR-V

Outlander Sport

Consumer Reports® Recommends

TRUE

FALSE

Car Book “Best Bet”

TRUE

FALSE

J.D. Power and Associates rated the CR-V first among compact suvs in owner reported satisfaction. This includes how well the vehicle performs and satisfies its owner’s expectations. The Outlander Sport isn’t in the top three in its category.

The CR-V was chosen as one of Car and Driver’s “Top Five/10Best Trucks” for 3 of the last 17 years. The Outlander Sport has never been a Car and Driver “Top Five/10Best Truck” pick.

Motor Trend selected the CR-V as their 2018 Sport Utility of the Year. The Outlander Sport has never been chosen.

The Honda CR-V outsold the Mitsubishi Outlander Sport by over 9 to one during the 2018 model year.

© 1991-2018 Advanta-STAR Automotive Research. All rights reserved.

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